Natural Thyroid Treatment Methods
Graves' Disease & Hyperthyroidism
Hashimoto's & Hypothyroidism
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The Anatomy Of An Autoimmune Thyroid Condition

Many people who have an autoimmune thyroid condition such as Graves’ Disease or Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis wonder how their condition developed in the first place.  While there are some theories on what can lead to an autoimmune thyroid disorder, there isn’t one specific cause that leads to these conditions.  In other words, there are most likely different causes of autoimmune thyroid conditions.

However, this doesn’t mean it’s impossible to find out the cause of such a condition in an individual with Graves’ Disease or Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis.  In many cases a competent doctor can find out the cause, or at least the major contributing factors of an autoimmune thyroid condition.  And once this cause is found, it is possible to restore the health of many people who have these conditions.  And even for those people with an autoimmune thyroid condition who can’t have their health completely restored back to normal, many of these people still can benefit from following a natural thyroid treatment protocol.

In any case, let’s discuss one of the most common ways in which an autoimmune thyroid condition can develop.  I’ve mentioned numerous times in the past how many people develop problems with their adrenal glands.  This usually takes time to develop, happening over a course of many months, or in most cases, many years.  There are typically three primary ways in which people develop weakened adrenal glands:

1. Eating too many refined foods and sugars. Eating refined foods and sugars on a regular basis will affect the hormones insulin and cortisol.  This will cause the pancreas to secrete insulin, and the adrenal glands to secrete cortisol.  When this happens frequently over a period of many years, causing the adrenal glands to secrete cortisol regularly, this will weaken the adrenal glands.  This in turn can lead to immune system problems, and thus eventually cause the development of an autoimmune thyroid condition.    So the best thing you can do is eat plenty of whole foods, and try to minimize the consumption of refined and processed foods.

2. Getting an insufficient amount of sleep each night. Not getting at least seven to eight hours sleep each day can affect your adrenal health.  Not getting sufficient sleep will also affect the cortisol levels.  The cortisol levels should normally be at their highest levels in the morning, and then decrease as the day moves on, with the lowest levels being at night right before going to bed.  Obviously this will differ for someone who works a third shift, but for someone who works a regular shift, staying up late watching television, surfing on the internet, or doing other things, followed by waking up early in the morning will affect your adrenal health if done for a prolonged period of time.  This is why you ideally want to try obtaining at least seven to eight hours of sleep each night, and more than this if at all possible.

3. Doing a poor job of managing stress. If you recall from previous articles and posts, the adrenal glands are designed to handle acute stress situations.  But in this day and age, most people deal with a lot of chronic stress.  This too can lead to weak adrenal glands by causing them to constantly secrete the hormone cortisol.  While you won’t be able to completely eliminate the stress from your life, there is an excellent chance you can do a much better job of managing it, which will help a great deal.

When someone develops weak adrenals through one or more of the above methods, this can lead to a compromised immune system.  And this compromised immune system can trigger an autoimmune response.  But why does someone develop an autoimmune condition which specifically involves the thyroid gland, and not another area of the body?  Well, weak adrenal glands will also put the body in a state of catabolism, which means the body will be breaking down.  This in turn will cause the thyroid gland to slow down this process, which can lead to a hypothyroid condition.  So the combination of the hypothyroid condition and the compromised immune system can lead to the development of Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, although genetics most likely plays a role in this.

As for why some people develop Graves’ Disease instead of Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, this not completely known, although just as is the case with the development of Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, genetics almost definitely is a factor.  After all, if someone with Graves’ Disease has a genetic marker for this condition, then it would make sense for them to develop this condition, whereas if they have the genetic marker for a different autoimmune condition then the triggering of the autoimmune response will most likely result in that specific condition.  When I was diagnosed with Graves’ Disease, it was confirmed through an Adrenal Stress Index test that I had weak adrenal glands.  This in turn probably compromised my immune system, and while it’s not completely known why I developed Graves’ Disease instead of Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, genetics probably played a role in this.

Other areas of the body can also potentially lead to the development of an autoimmune thyroid condition.  As another example, digestive issues can also weaken the immune system, and potentially can lead to the development of an autoimmune condition.  If someone has leaky gut syndrome, where proteins and other larger molecules are passing through the damaged intestinal lining into the bloodstream, this can trigger an autoimmune response and thus lead to a condition such as Graves’ Disease or Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis.  Other gut issues can also affect the immune system.  So one will need to correct any digestive system issues, which in turn will also help with immunity.  Many people have problems with both their digestive system and adrenal glands, so of course both of these areas will need to be addressed.

What’s important to understand is that having one autoimmune condition can lead to the development of other autoimmune conditions in the future.  This is why just treating the thyroid symptoms alone doesn’t make much sense.  Even in cases when thyroid medication (thyroid hormone, antithyroid medication, etc.), RAI, or thyroid surgery is necessary, these treatment methods frequently won’t correct the underlying condition.  While the medication might be required to manage the symptoms, they won’t do anything for weak adrenals, digestive problems, or the autoimmune component of Graves’ Disease and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis.  So in cases where the autoimmune thyroid disorder can’t be completely cured, the immune system component and other compromised areas of the body need to be addressed in order to prevent, or at least reduce the likelihood of other autoimmune conditions from developing in the future.

Environmental toxins can potentially trigger an autoimmune thyroid condition to develop.  In this situation it can be challenging to correct such a problem, but frequently a detoxification program can help to clean out many of these toxins.  And then the person will of course need to try minimizing their exposure to these toxins in the future.  Sometimes the autoimmune thyroid condition can be caused by a combination of environmental toxins, along with one or more compromised areas of the body.  This of course will be even more challenging to correct, but if the person is willing to take responsibility for their health and follow a natural treatment protocol there is an excellent chance they will receive good results.

So hopefully you have a better understanding as to what factors can lead to the development of an autoimmune thyroid disorder.  While both Graves’ Disease and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis are no doubt complex conditions, many people with these conditions can have their health restored back to normal once these compromised areas of the body are addressed.  I’m living proof of this.  But in order to do this it’s necessary to first detect these problems, and then attempt to correct them.


 

42 Comments

  1. cullen says:

    You were so kind to send this to me. Bless you. I will really focus on making sure those are not problems for me. I think you are correct. I tested for having hypo, but it went away after I retired and my stress level went down. When I retested months later it was not there.

    Jeanne

  2. Romeo says:

    I have graves disease and celiac disease. I recently in the past two weeks, I began taking in a pro-biotic liquid and adrenal gland supplements. For the first time within this past year. My symptoms started to fade away. The whites of my eyes came back and my eyes balls went back to their normal size, my heart rate went back to normal, my digestion improved and I felt so much better had more energy. I need to take more of theses supplements, because I’m not 100% symptom free yet. I believe this can reverse my graves disease.

    • Dr. Eric says:

      That’s great news, thank you for sharing your story with us. Of course it’s also important to eat well and modify other lifestyle factors in addition to taking supplements. But it’s great to hear you’re doing better.

  3. Kathy Blanchard says:

    Tried naturopathic solutions until I developed atrial fibrillation and ended up in the hospital with it. Took meds to calm thyroid down for one year but it didn’t work. Then came RAI. FElt somewhat better after a few months but when the dr put me back on thyroid meds, I seemed to go downhill physically. Now after 1 1/2 years, he is thinking I need the animal glandulars instead of the synthetic pills. Right now I am off the med and waiting to see what happens. He said my readings were normal on my last visit on Tuesday, May 10. But my graves disease antiboies were at 362 with normal 50 and below. How do I bring that down or is it even possible? My thyroid has probably been acting up all of my life as I think back but this was the worse! Thank you considering my dilemma.

    • Dr. Eric says:

      Hi Kathy,

      It is possible to bring the thyroid antibodies levels by following a natural treatment protocol. Some people claim that just changing one’s diet alone, and specifically eliminating gluten will lower the thyroid antibodies. But usually it does take a combination of diet, supplementation, and modifying other lifestyle factors to restore one’s health back to normal. Even though you had a bad experience with natural treatment methods, I would recommend geting a second opinion. After all, a person who has a bad experience with a dentist rarely stops going to the dentist, but instead will usually just see someone else. And the same thing applies with seeing a holistic doctor, as different holistic doctors will practice differently. Of course another option is to just change your diet alone, eliminate gluten for at least 90 days, and then get retested. Then if this approach doesn’t work you can always choose to see a different holistic doctor. Obviously it’s ultimately your decision to make.

  4. Sherri says:

    Unfortunately, I discovered your webpage/facebook one week after I had surgery to remove my thyroid. After 3 years of dealing with Graves and not responding to the medications and having severe side effects, I opted to have my thyroid removed and now take levothyroxin daily. My pathology reports on my thyroid also showed I had Hoshimoto’s too. I am 5 weeks post op and want to ensure I don’t have additional autoimmune issues. Can you please explain what you mean by “environmental toxins”.

    I work with two coworkers who have had similar thyroid issues and we all feel it is strange that we came down with the same type of problems around the same time. We work in a very old building that has had very bad mold issues. We all believe this could be an underlying factor, but just don’t know. One coworker discussed this with their MD and was told no, it was not a factor.

    What do you think?

    Thank you,

    Sherri

    • Dr. Eric says:

      Hi Sherri,

      By “environmental toxins” I’m referring to any chemical in the environment which can be hazardous to your health. And there are thousands of them out there. Who knows whether your work environment led to the development to your condition, as it could have been a coincidence. On the other hand, perhaps there was some type of chemical there, such as a pesticide they used which affected the health of you and your coworker’s immune systems, which in turn triggered the development of Graves’ Disease. It’s definitely possible, and not a surprise that a medical doctor would rule it out. But if they read the book “The Autoimmune Epidemic” they probably would have a different stance.

  5. Keith says:

    Could mold in a home be a contributing factor to autoimmune thyroid condition.

  6. Mo says:

    I read a lot but the only thing I’am looking for is a diet where I can read how to loose weight for a hashimoto patient!!!! Nobody knows… I think, it’s a big mysterie.
    When do you provide diet information?

    • Dr. Eric says:

      If you visit my articles page you will see some articles on diet. Keep in mind that many people with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis also have a hormone imbalance which can make it extremely difficult to lose weight…even if someone eats well and exercises regularly.

  7. Brigitta says:

    Dear Dr. Eric,

    Congratulations on your website, it is really great! I want to say thank you for sharing all these information with us, i find it very useful. I have Hashimotho disease, and decided on natural therapy, as the attitude of tradicional doctors were very disappointing. After the first shock I managed to find a holistic doctor ( was not easy at all in Hungary)

    I take selenium, vitamins and other minerals, Vitamin D, and drink a special tee every day. Moreover, I follow paleolit diet, meaning no dairy products, no grains and no sugar. I never suffered from overweight, but with this diet I unwantedly lost 5 kilos within 4 months (my BMI is 18,2). I do sports on a regular basis, and thanks to this diet I feel very good. My TSH was 40 in January (at the time when I was diagnosed with this thyroid condition) and now it is “only” 12,5 (4,5 is the high end of the normal range). fT4 is still slightly under the normal range, but improving slowly.
    I feel that I am on a good track,I know I still have a long way to go, but and I am really positive about the success of natural therapy.

    Once again, thanks for publishing your thoughts and advises, it gives me lots of positive affirmations and support.

    Kindest regards from Budapest,
    Brigitta

    • Dr. Eric says:

      Hi Brigitta,

      I’m glad you find my website to be valuable. It’s great to hear that you are benefiting from following a natural treatment protocol. Keep up the good work, as I know it’s not an easy process, but I commend you for sticking with it.

  8. Liza says:

    Hi Dr. Eric, I was recently diagnosed with Graves, but my trigger was Lyme’s Disease. I will admit I had many of the other precursors for getting a thyroid disease however after many, many tests, conversations and timelines, we have concluded that the Lyme’s Disease put more over the tipping point. So now I’m taking a month’s worth of antibiotic along with heart medication and anti-thyroid hormone in addition to a large amount of vitamins and herbs. My numbers were just getting worse and worse and I had no choice but to take the medicine much to my dismay. I think some patients should also get tested for Lyme’s or at least not if they had a tick bite. Thanks for your wealth of information!

    • Dr. Eric says:

      Hi Liza,

      You bring up a good point, as this would make a good article topic in the future, and I agree that in some cases testing for Lyme disease can be beneficial. Thank you for sharing your story with us.

  9. len says:

    hello Dr. Eric I am 68 years old. I served in vietnam in 71&72 some where around 1988 I as best as I can remember I started developing signs of a hypo-thyroid. I did’nt know what was wrong with me as the symptoms escalated through the years, I had been a heavy drinker and had thought it was the alcohol, but the symptoms did’nt go away when I quit. In 2003 a V.A. doctor diagnosed me with hypo-thyroidism and said I had an auto-immune disorder. know one would say, but could this have been caused by the agent orange and the other herbicides and insecticides I sprayed as a helicopter pilot?

    • Dr. Eric says:

      Hi Len,

      There is no way to tell for sure, but it wouldn’t be a surprise if the herbicides and insecticides were a trigger for your Hashimoto’s condition. So it definitely is very possible, although of course there could be other factors that caused or contributed to your condition as well.

  10. Cindy says:

    Hi Dr.Eric,

    This web site is wonderful, thank you so much for sharing! I am in the process of starting up my own holistic nutrition business, finishing my Master’s degree in Nutrition and Health Coaching certificate from I.I.N.
    I take very good care of myself, and last year found out I had adrenal fatigue and high levels of Mercury from a hair analysis test I took.
    Then in September, after coming back from an upstate vacation (when I went a little overboard on the gluten) I felt as if I was constantly high. I couldn’t snap out of this feeling that my head was in a cloud. I found out I had Hashimoto’s with a TSH of 16.
    All the Doctors I went to (“integrative” included) didn’t offer much hope. I am on Armour to help with symptoms and I have been 100% gluten-free since Mid-September. My symptoms are about 85% better and am definitely functional, thank god. I have been also trying to practice calming, breathing and mind-body connection. Exercise seems to be my best source of abundant energy!
    Anyway, your articles are so informative I LOVED THEM! I have been going back and forth with signing up with you. My Aunt has Hashimoto’s, so there must be some genetic component…but my thinking is the mercury or adrenal fatigue caused this—is this something you deal with a lot and do you think we could really get to the underlying cause? I’m also having irregular periods which I know in my heart is all connected (even though I’ve had irregular periods since I began menstruating) I found out my FSH to LH ratio is high. I would like to get this all under control!

    TO everyone else reading this–don’t give up hope when the thyroid symptoms kick in!!! just stay on track..and I swear by exercising! To my knowledge, exercise “forces” the thyroid to work…just don’t over-do it as you don’t want to causes extra stress, just enough to get going 🙂

    • Dr. Eric says:

      Hi Cindy,

      I’m glad you have found my articles to be valuable. And it’s great to hear that you’re starting your own holistic nutrition business, as I’m sure you’re very excited about this. It seems that there is a genetic component for Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis in most cases, although lifestyle and environmental factors play a big role in the expression of these genes. To answer your question, I do think it’s very possible to detect and then correct the underlying cause, although I’m not saying this will be easy. Adrenal fatigue and high mercury levels definitely can trigger these conditions, but there of course can be other factors as well. And one of the big challenges is finding what the trigger is. And once the trigger is eliminated then one has to address the compromised areas of the body, as just removing the trigger usually isn’t sufficient to accomplish this.

  11. Nancy says:

    Wow! Thanks for posting this article. I have often wondered about the origin of my Hashi’s and, of course, was provided no real answers many decades ago by my endocrinologist when I was diagnosed. I was told recently that potential Lyme disease has been implicated. Apparently, many Lyme patients also have Hashi’s and Lyme is suspected of triggering auto-immunity. Since tick-borne diseases are on the rise, I just thought I’d throw that out there for you and your readers.

  12. Sherri says:

    Hi, I wanted to get your views on whether the mercury ‘silver’ fillings in teeth could cause Hashimoto’s disease? A dishonest dentist with gambling debts (!) filled about nine of my teeth by the time I was seven, and I doubt if I needed so many fillings. I had read about the teeth meridians and that the thyroid is so close to teeth, that the mercury could affect the thyroid?
    By the time I was ten I had fibromyalgia and undiagnosed thyroid hyperthyroidism that later went into hypo thyroid disease, and I was diagnosed when I was around 18.

    • Dr. Eric says:

      Sherri,

      It is possible that mercury could trigger an autoimmune condition such as Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. It of course is difficult to tell if the fillings are what lead to your condition, but it is possible.

  13. hannah says:

    I have been diagnosed with Graves after dealing with Lyme about 6 months ago. I went through 2 rounds of antibiotics for the lyme then went hyperthyroid (I thought I was developing an anxiety disorder) None of my doctors have really addressed this possible connection and I wonder, is there anything that can be done? Should I have the Lyme retested periodically? Is the body’s response to the Lyme just so taxing that the immune system goes haywire?
    I had an osteopath say that he thought all the autoimmune disorders actually came from GMO foods. That a reaction to GMO causes leaky gut which allows in foreign proteins and the body fights against them causing immune issues from food allergies to thyroid issues to celiac. He doesnt think its gluten at all, just GMO wheat etc.
    I also wanted to mention I had a baby 16 months ago, and although postpartum thyroiditis seems to be studied and acknowledged by doctors, the connection between graves and childbirth seems to be so common but totally dismissed by medical professionals. I wonder what you think about that too.
    I guess I have the trifecta working against me. but I have a great naturopath and an endo who is willing to give me 8 weeks going the natural route to try to get my TSH and antibodies moving in the right direction. Thanks for everything you do! There is definitely an epidemic at hand.

  14. Kiran says:

    Hi Dr.Eric,
    I am from India. Female unmarried 26 years. I have been diagnosed with hypothyroid and I am glad I came across your articles. I wish I could restore my health back to normal. When I met endocrynologist he prescribed me l-thyroxine 50mg. But I wanted to go to holistic doctor who can help me in restoring my health back and I found one such doctor here in my place. My problem is I could visit him only after 5 days from now and my symptoms are worseing day by day. so my parents advised me to take thyroxine tablet for the symptoms and visit the holistic doctor after five days. Doctor please tell me should I do this or shall I wait? Doctor I also have gallstones and I am using herbal medcines for them. So does it come under auto immune disease? I would be grateful to you.

  15. Mary Lynn Houtz says:

    Dr. Eric,

    Is it possible to have Graves even if the blood test say you are normal? I have hyperthyroid with normal antibodies at 2 different tests 6 weeks apart. The reason I ask is, I am noticing my eyes are bulging, especially my right, and both have major bags. I have been following a natural protocol for months and am not getting any improvement.

  16. Charlene says:

    Have you ever treated someone with a high TSH (37) but no signs or symptoms that would normally accompany the bloodwork? T4 & T3 normal as well. Doctors see my numbers & want to medicate me, but I feel like nothing is broken why introduce side affects from medication. Cholesterol normal, weight good, blood sugar good, healthy diet awareness plus supplements. Psoriasis is my biggest problem and I use a light box treatment about once or twice a year, plus eliminating some foods has helped keep it reasonably under control. Thank again for keeping articles free and informative. Your website has catapulted me on to do more research & reading.

    • Dr. Eric says:

      Hi Charlene,

      Yes, I have worked with people who had a high TSH with everything else within normal range. Did they also test the thyroid antibodies, specifically the thyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies? Either way the goal should be to find out what the cause of the problem is.

  17. Suzanne says:

    I am wondering if there is a connection between gallbladder removal and/or appendectomies? In Feb 2010 I had my gallbladder removed at the age of 32. My surgeon told me the likely culprit was the birth control I was taking, Yasmin. After the surgery I stopped taking all birth control. Then in July 2012 I had an appendectomy. I remember speaking with my primary about the affects of the gallbladder removal. Although I digested food differently for about 6 mths after, I had begin to gain weight with no real explanation. In the summer of 2012 is when I began to feel the extreme fatigue which finally lead me to have my GP run tests. It was becoming so bad that wiping off my counters made me need to lay down. My TSH was 4.8 & on the next visit when I told her about the research I had done & that there was conflict about te results & i wanted more answers she finally ran my T3 & T4 when she finally took ALL my symptoms into account. I knew there was an issue with my thyroid-it was a gut feeling. I can’t remember my exact results right now(!) but one was in the mid 900’s. I was prescribed Synthyroid. I switched doctors & for the past 2 mths I have been on Armour
    Also, I am curious about the affects of alcoholism on the thyroid. I have been in recovery since August 2010. I know that I had literally put my body through hell so I don’t know if it’s possible to pinpoint the cause of my Hashimoto’s. I would love to get your input.

  18. Penny Markle says:

    Thank you for sending this information about adrenal glands etc/ Thyroid health and immune system. I ask my internist several times when I was first diagnosed with Hyperthyroidism/Grave’s disease. How can we fix the Thyroid instead of taking this pill and that pill and band aiding the problem. He said just take your meds. I also asked my family doctor when/why/how the thyroid goes goofy. No reply. It took year and a half on Tapizole for Hyper,2010/2012 then six months it ran normal, now I am on Sythroid for Hypo 2013. I quick smoking six months ago, eating properly and trying to get all my vitamins via vegies and fruit. Anyway I appreciate all the information on adrenal gland you send me, plus the research I’m doing on my own I hope to turn this around for good if possible.
    Thank you again

    • Dr. Eric says:

      Hi Penny,

      Most medical doctors don’t know how to address the cause of the problem, which is why your internist wasn’t able to answer your question, and could only respond by telling you to “just take your meds”. I’m glad to hear that you quit smoking, as there definitely is a correlation between cigarette smoking and Graves’ Disease. And of course eating well is extremely important with any chronic health condition.

  19. Anne says:

    I was diagnosed with Grave’s Disease in 2010. My levels seem to fluctuate quite a bit. At times they have been high, sometimes low and even normal in between over the years. My TSH level has remained consistently almost non-existent which my endocrinologist tells me is the problem. He has called this “Intermittent Grave’s Disease”. I’ve never heard of such a thing but I don’t seem to have any symptoms unless I am under a great deal of stress. I’ve had 2 doctors prescribe a medication that “might” put this into remission after a year. After reading the list of potential side effects, I told the endocrinologist that I’m not interested. He has recently referred me to another doctor to have the RAI treatment done. I’m not interested in that either. My doctor has been stressing the importance of treating this due to the fact that this disease depletes your bones of calcium and will cause issues in the long run. I can’t help but think that there has to be a natural approach to treating Grave’s Disease. I don’t want to be on thyroid medication for the rest of my life and don’t really want to have the RAI treatment done unless I absolutely have to. I do take Propranalol every day and considering my situation is “intermittent”, I don’t know if I really need that. I’m willing to make any necessary changes to my diet that will potentially help reverse this. It has been a challenge to me to find someone who can help me with this. Any recommendations you might have? I would really appreciate it.

    Thank you,

    Anne

    • Dr. Eric says:

      Hi Anne,

      Graves’ Disease is an autoimmune condition, and so the key to restoring someone’s health is to find out what’s triggering the autoimmune response. There can be numerous factors responsible for this. I know you said it has been a challenge to find someone who can help you with your condition, but I really would recommend trying to find a natural healthcare professional to work with who will go over your case history, recommend additional tests, and do what is necessary to find out what is the underlying cause of your condition. Until then I would continue eating well, as you want to eat whole foods while avoiding the refined foods and sugars, and you might want to consider going on a gluten and dairy free trial. Stress management is also essential. If you haven’t done so already I would also recommend attending one of my free webinars on natural thyroid health.

  20. Kristine says:

    I had my adrenals checked and they are fine.
    I remember you saying that corticosteroids, over time, can also lead to Hashimotos.
    I had left hip bursitis and numerous injections over a period of 10 years.
    I cannot prove that is the cause, but I bet it contributed to it, that along with a very stressful and abusive childhood.

    My thyroid levels were up and down for years. I have since ceased cortisone injections, and I am waiting for March to come, so we can check my TSH levels again.

    Thank you for all the emails and information. While I still feel sluggish,(on synthroid) I am feeling better than I did. Coconut oil capsules, have made my constipation, go away, and CO-Q-10, has made “cravings” disappear. I eat such small portions and I get full very quickly now.

    • Dr. Eric says:

      Hi Kristine,

      As you mentioned, there is no way to prove that receiving the cortisone injections led to Hashimoto’s, but they definitely could have been a factor. I’m glad the coconut oil capsules and CoQ10 have helped. Thank you for reading my blog posts and articles.

  21. Mary says:

    Hi Dr Eric

    What is the difference between hyperthyroid and graves disease?

    Thank you

    • Dr. Eric says:

      Hi Mary,

      Hyperthyroidism is characterized by high thyroid hormone levels, and a depressed TSH. About 90% of hyperthyroid conditions are autoimmune, although it is possible to have hyperthyroidism without an autoimmune component. Graves’ Disease is an autoimmune “hyperthyroid” condition characterized by TSH receptor antibodies. These antibodies attack the TSH receptors, which cause the thyroid gland to secrete thyroid hormone. The condition is usually caused by a combination of genetic and lifestyle/environmental factors.

  22. mary says:

    Dear Dr. Eric,

    Thanks for the wealth of info. You generously provide to your readers. I send an email to a couple days ago, not sure you got it.

    I have high TSI, which has affected my right eye, slightly protruding. It has been six months, and depresses me a lot. Every other tests ( blood tests) for thyroid, have taken so for is normal, except TSI is 407. What shall I do to bring the TSI down? Has any other readers had this problem, please share your experience. Than you very much.

    • Dr. Eric says:

      Hi Mary,

      Thank you for reading my articles and blog posts, as I’m glad you have found the information to be valuable. In order to bring down the TSI antibodies the goal is to find out what is triggering the autoimmune response. This admittedly can be challenging, as there are many factors which can trigger autoimmunity such as food allergens, pathogens, and even stress. As a result I would recommend finding a local natural healthcare professional to work with, as they will try to find out the underlying cause, and then do what is necessary to address it.

  23. Carla says:

    Your posts and emails have helped me so much to get to the bottom of things. My thyroid is hypo. I’m still trying to figure it out but you put me in the right direction. I’ve had my antibodies tested and finding out today .
    Thanks !!! No Dr has directly told me anything but take this. Not me! I’m smarter than that 🙂

    • Dr. Eric says:

      Hi Carla,

      I’m glad the information I have provided have helped! Thank you for reading my articles and blog posts, as I do appreciate it.

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Get Your Free Guide Entitled
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You will also receive email
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Natural Thyroid Health


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Natural Treatment Methods:
Graves Disease Treatment
Hypothyroidism Treatment
Hyperthyroidism Treatment
Natural Thyroid treatment


Conventional Treatment
Methods:
Radioactive Iodine
Thyroid Hormone